Gifts for the Graduate

Tyndale House Publishers

Whether finishing college, high school, middle school, or even kindergarten, graduation is a time of transition and change. It is an exciting time that also comes with a bit of trepidation about the future. What’s next? How does this change my relationships? Is the best really yet to come?

Change will always be part of our lives, but we can help our loved ones confidently take this next step, knowing they are grounded in the word of the Lord, which will help establish a firm foundation for the exciting adventures to come.

Here are some ideas for Bible gifts for the graduates in your life.

Kindergarten Graduate

The Hands-On Bible is a perfect first full Bible for young readers. The trusted and easy-to-understand New Living Translation text is combined with activities, crafts, games, recipes, and more to help kids engage with the truths of the Bible in a fun way. The whole family can be involved in the activities so you can get conversations started that bring you closer together as you grow in your understanding of God’s Word. Purchase here

Middle School Graduates

The Teen Life Application Study Bible is packed with features designed to meet the challenges and needs of today’s high school students. Based on the bestselling Life Application Study Bible, it includes notes and features that help teens ground themselves in the truth of God’s Word and apply it to situations they face each day. Purchase here

Inspire Bible for Girls is a coloring and journaling Bible uniquely designed for girls. This Bible includes over 500 full- and partial-page Scripture line-art illustrations for coloring right alongside the New Living Translation text. It includes more than 300 devotionals and more than 160 journaling prompts, and it has lots of wide-margin space for creative journaling and art. Purchase here

EPIC Bible is a visual journey through 169 Bible stories designed for fans of graphic novels. It was created by some of the best comic book artists from DC and Marvel. The Epic Bible transports readers through a visual journey of Scripture from Eden to eternity. It engages even the most reluctant readers with brilliant and dramatic full-color graphic art and uses the New Living Translation for conversation text. Purchase here. Also available in Spanish

High School Graduates

Linking to remarkably creative audio and video resources, the NLT Streetlights New Testament explains Christian truth to young people and serves as a basic discipleship tool. Its unique tone and approach to the gospel appeal strongly to those in an urban culture. The features focus on helping readers engage with the Word of God through unique audio and visual content, such as putting the New Living Translation to beats and street art that reflects people in the New Testament. Purchase here

The HelpFinder Bible makes it easy to find the Bible’s answers to life’s difficult questions. Application notes connect the Bible’s truths, and the extensive HelpFinder topical index at the front of the Bible provides instant access to thousands of verses and notes on well over 100 key topics that are important and relevant for today’s issues, pointing readers to where God’s answers can be discovered. Purchase here

Christians Basics Bible is filled with features designed to help readers connect biblical teachings to Christian beliefs and see how those beliefs apply to their lives. By delivering the right amount of both information and application, the Christian Basics Bible can become the catalyst for living a vibrant Christian life. Purchase here

With innovative, full-color visual guides at the top of each reading, The Wayfinding Bible provides readers with three paths through God’s Word: the flyover route, the direct route, and the scenic route. The flyover route covers the most important events in the Bible in about 40 readings, giving a fresh overview of how these events tell the Bible’s big story of God’s redemption. Following the direct route, readers will develop a better understanding of how God’s story unfolds throughout history in about 200 readings. The scenic route helps readers explore new territory and discover the richness and depth of God’s Word in about 400 readings. All without the discouragement of getting bogged down in any single book. Purchase here

College Graduates and Beyond

The remarkable Filament Bible Collection features comfortable reading Bibles in a variety of easy-to-carry sizes, covers, and styles. But there is so much more: Mind-blowing study notes, devotionals, videos, worship music, and more are curated for the page you are reading through the Filament Bible app. Just scan the page number with your phone or tablet to be seamlessly connected to vast and varied in-depth content related to what you are reading. Purchase here

When you put a Bible translation that can be trusted and understood together with one of the most valued Bible study assets in history, what do you get? Tyndale’s Life Application Study Bible in the New Living Translation. This Bible overflows with resources that help readers not only study God’s Word but also apply it to their lives. It includes more than 10,000 notes and features, including  profiles of Bible characters, in-depth charts and maps for reference, extensive book introductions, a vast index, a Bible dictionary, and more. Purchase here

The Illustrated Study Bible brings Scripture’s message to life by giving readers a gorgeous visual study experience. Hundreds of information-rich windows to the Bible world instantly communicate foundational truths and complex information in an understandable, compelling way for today’s visual generation. The who, what, where, when, and why of the Bible come alive with stunning photos, illustrations, infographics, and full-color maps integrated seamlessly with background material, study notes, and theme articles. Purchase here

NLT Art of Life Holy Bible weaves the beautiful NLT text into a rich tapestry of artwork illustrating many living things mentioned in Scripture—people, plants, and animals. Captions highlighting the significance of each illustration and the wide-margin design offer readers a unique way to meditate on Scripture by focusing on God’s creation. Featuring 450 original, hand-drawn illustrations in a unique style, this Bible encourages contemplation and visual interaction with the Word. Purchase here

The complete 16-volume set of Swindoll’s Living Insights New Testament Commentary draws on beloved pastor and author Chuck Swindoll’s more than 50 years of experience studying and preaching God’s Word. Each volume includes both the NLT and NASB translations of the Bible, verse-by-verse commentary, charts, maps, photos, key terms, and background articles with practical application.

The Birth of Christ

Tyndale House Publishers

“And while they were there, the time came for her baby to be born. 7She gave birth to her firstborn son. She wrapped him snugly in strips of cloth and laid him in a manger, because there was no lodging available for them.” Luke 2: 6-7, NLT

Article from the Illustrated Study Bible

Luke’s account of the birth of Jesus is a study in contrasts. On the one side is the lowliness of the birth. A poor peasant couple makes their way to their ancestral home of Bethlehem to register for a census imposed on them by the oppressive Roman Empire. Their journey is a long and hard one from Galilee, and when they arrive they can find no place of lodging. They are consigned to a place reserved for animals. There is a sense of poverty, rejection and obscurity. At the birth of the child, announcements are sent not to great kings or to the rich and powerful, but to lowly shepherds watching their flocks in the field.

Yet beside this humble lowliness is a message of unspeakable power and grandeur. The child who is laid in a manger is the Messiah, the long-awaited descendant of King David. He will reign triumphant over the people of Israel and his kingdom will never end. He is the one spoken about by all the prophets. All of history has been pointing forward to its climax in him. An army of mighty angels comes from heaven to announce his birth.

These contrasts are a foretaste of things to come. In Jesus, the God of Israel and Lord of all the earth has come to visit and to save his people. The Divine One reaches down to meet them where they are. Throughout Luke’s Gospel, Jesus will show special concern for the lowly, the poor, the outcast, and sinners. These are the ones he has come to

save because they recognize their need for him. They receive the message of salvation with joy and rejoicing.

The contrast between lowliness and exaltation also relates to Jesus’ mission. Though wicked people reject him and put him to death, Jesus is vindicated at his resurrection.

n and exalted to the right hand of God, where he reigns as Lord and Messiah. From there he pours out the Spirit of God to guide and direct his church. Through Jesus’ life, death, resurrection, and exaltation Jesus provides

forgiveness of sins and eternal life to all those who respond in faith to him.

Learn more about the Illustrated Study Bible

Mary the Mother of Jesus

Tyndale House Publishers

“…but Mary kept all these things in her heart and thought about them often.” Luke 2:19, NLT

Profile from the Illustrated Study Bible

Mary, the wife of Joseph, was the virgin mother of Jesus. Luke tells us that as a young girl in Nazareth, Mary was betrothed to Joseph, a local carpenter. Before the marriage took place, an angel announced to her that she would become pregnant by the power of God’s Spirit and give birth to the Son of God (1:26‑35). Mary responded to this extraordinary message in simple faith, humbly submitting herself to God’s will (1:38, 46‑55). Shortly thereafter, the message was confirmed by her relative Elizabeth, who spoke of Mary as the most blessed of all women (1:39‑45). Mary’s miraculous bearing of the Son of God was viewed as a fulfillment of prophecy (Isa 7:14).

Jesus’ birth took place in unusual circumstances, when Joseph took Mary to Bethlehem to register for an official Roman census. The child was born in a stable because no other lodging was available (Luke 2:1‑7). Some time later, Mary and Joseph fled to Egypt to save the child from Herod’s massacre of young boys in the Bethlehem area (Matt 2:13‑18). When they returned, they resettled in Nazareth to raise their family (Matt 2:19‑23). After Jesus’ birth, Mary apparently gave birth to several other sons and daughters (Matt 13:55‑56; Mark 6:3). It is likely that Mary herself told Luke the details of Jesus’ birth and the unusual events associated with it (Luke 2:51).

When Jesus was twelve years old, he stayed in the Temple during a family trip to Jerusalem. Mary and Joseph rebuked him for staying behind when they departed, but they did not understand Jesus’ response (2:41‑51). Early in Jesus’ public ministry, Mary encouraged him to do a miracle at a wedding in Cana (John 2:1‑11). Later, when she and Jesus’ brothers went to see Jesus, he said that his disciples were his “real family” (Luke 8:19‑21; Matt 12:46‑50; Mark 3:31‑35).

When Jesus was crucified, Mary was among the women looking on (cp. Mark 15:40, 47; John 19:25). As Jesus was dying, he asked John, the “disciple he loved,” to take care of Mary as his own mother (John 19:26‑27). After Jesus’ death and resurrection, Mary was apparently a member of the believing community; she is listed among those who were praying together when the Spirit came on the Day of Pentecost (Acts 1:14).

God chose Mary to bring his Son, the Savior, into the world. For all Christians, she is a model of humble and obedient submission to God’s will.

Learn more about the Illustrated Study Bible

Gifts for the Graduate

Tyndale House Publishers

Graduation is an exciting time, but it can also be a bit scary as we move from one stage of life into the next. Whether graduating from 8th grade, high school, college, or beyond, a Bible can be the perfect gift. Give your loved one the gift of comfort, hope, encouragement, and direction as they begin this new journey. Here are some ideas:

8th Grade Graduate
Inspire Bibles are single-column, wide-margin Bibles designed for creative engagement in God’s Word. They include hundreds of verse line-art illustrations to color and reflect on while reading. The original Inspire Bible, the Inspire PRAISE Bible, and the Inspire PRAYER Bible are all available in large print, and a giant print edition of the Inspire PRAYER Bible recently released.

The Teen Life Application Study Bible provides direction and understanding for readers navigating their teen years. With features and notes created to address the challenges teens face, it helps them understand and apply God’s Word to all areas of their lives and encounter God in an authentic way.

High School Graduate
The Life Application Study Bible takes readers beyond knowing the Bible to living it out. Filled with over 10,000 notes and features, it is one of the most comprehensive and most beloved study Bibles. It is the perfect companion to help loved one stay grounded in God’s Word as they head off to college or into the work world.

Streetlights New Testament combines print and audio to engage youth and young adults in God’s Word in a way that is comfortable for them. It is a visually compelling, easy-to-understand New Testament portion that is easy to throw into a backpack for reading on the go.

HelpFinder Bible has one of the most extensive topical indexes to help readers quickly find answers in Scripture to the questions and circumstances surrounding them. As your loved one is preparing to enter a new environment, this Bible can help them find God’s truth at their point of need.

College and Higher Education Graduate
The Illustrated Study Bible is one of the most beautiful Bibles on the market. It gives readers an entirely new visual study experience. Hundreds of information-rich windows to the Bible world instantly communicate foundational truths and complex information in an understandable way.

The Filament Bible Collection is a revolutionary combination of print + digital. The beautiful, uninterrupted Bible reading experience is enhanced by scanning the page number, giving access to study, devotional, video, and worship music resources curated to what you are reading.

NLT Study Bible is our flagship study Bible. Filled with thousands of notes, articles, and more from fifty of the world’s leading Bible scholars, this Bible will take you deeper into God’s Word and help you better understand the world of the Bible.

Art of Life Bible weaves the beautiful NLT text into a rich tapestry of artwork, illustrating many living things mentioned in Scripture—people, plants, and animals. Captions highlighting their significance and the wide-margin design offer readers a unique way to meditate on Scripture by focusing on God’s creation.

Seminary Graduate
Immerse: The Bible Reading Experience takes away the distraction of chapter and verse numbers for an enjoyable reading experience. It allows readers to engage with the Bible in the original literary formats, such as letters, poetry, and history, without being bogged down in unintended breaks in the flow of the narrative.

Cornerstone Biblical Commentary is a great way to help a new pastor or ministry leader build a trusted library. Comprised of 12 volumes for the Old Testament and 8 for the New Testament, this set will equip pastors and Christian leaders with exegetical and theological knowledge to better understand and apply God’s Word by presenting the message of each passage as well as an overview of other issues surrounding the text.

Swindoll’s Living Insights New Testament Commentary is a must-have for any pastor, teacher, or person who wants to go deeper in studying God’s Word. The complete 16-volume set includes both the NLT and NASB translations of the Bible, verse-by-verse commentary, charts, maps, photos, key terms, and background articles with practical application.

More than a Mother’s Day Gift

Tyndale House Publishers

Most of us have a woman in our life who has given us support and been a listening ear and encourager. She’s someone who understands us and sees the best in us. It might be a mom, but it also might be a grandma, an aunt, a friend, a mentor, or a teacher. Mother’s Day is a time to thank those women and let them know how much they mean to us. A Bible is a wonderful way to say, “I love you.” It can offer encouragement and hope. It can be a treasured gift to pass down from generation to generation sharing what God is doing and has done in the lives of those who mean so much to us. Our Bible team wants to share a few ideas with you for this Mother’s Day:

The THRIVE Devotional Bible for Women is for every woman who wants to know God more deeply. God’s design for His children is that they live flourishing, fulfilling, joy-filled lives in Christ. This Bible is available in a standard edition and also in a wide-margin edition with lots of room for notes, art, prayers, and more.

The Life Application Study Bible takes readers beyond knowing the Bible to living it out. Filled with over 10,000 notes and features, it is one of the most comprehensive and most beloved study Bibles in the world.

Inspire Bibles are single-column, wide-margin Bibles designed for creative engagement with God’s Word. They include hundreds of line-art illustrations of Bible verses to color and reflect on while reading. The original Inspire Bible, Inspire PRAISE Bible, and Inspire PRAYER Bible are available in large print, and a giant-print Inspire PRAYER Bible is releasing this month.

The Illustrated Study Bible is one of the most beautiful Bibles on the market. It gives readers an entirely new visual study experience. Hundreds of information-rich windows to the world of the Bible communicate foundational truths and complex information in an understandable way.

The Filament Bible Collection is a revolutionary combination of print + digital. The beautiful, uninterrupted Bible reading experience is enhanced by scanning a small symbol on each page that gives you access to study, devotional, video, and worship resources curated to what you are reading.

The Art of Life Bible is a beautiful way to reflect on God as creator. It weaves the beautiful NLT text into a rich tapestry of artwork illustrating many living things mentioned in Scripture—people, plants, and animals. Featuring 450 original hand-drawn illustrations in a unique style this Bible encourages contemplation and visual interaction with the Word.

This next one might seem out of box, but the Hands-On Bible for kids might be the perfect gift for a mom or grandma who is looking for a way to come together with her family in God’s Word. With questions designed to get conversations started, activities, crafts, and games for the whole family to enjoy, it’s a gift to connect with God and each other through His Word.

The Cross and Passover

Tyndale House Publishers

Article from the Illustrated Study Bible

“It was the day of preparation, and the Jewish leaders didn’t want the bodies hanging there the next day, which was the Sabbath (and a very special Sabbath, because it was Passover week). So they asked Pilate to hasten their deaths by ordering that their legs be broken. Then their bodies could be taken down.” John 19:31, NLT

At the beginning of John’s Gospel, John the Baptist introduced Jesus by calling him the “Lamb of God” (1:29, 36). This odd phrase might refer to the sacrificial lamb that was killed daily in the Temple (Exod 29:38‑46) or to the sacrificial lamb of Isa 53:7 (cp. Acts 8:32‑35; Rev 5:5‑14). Both of these sacrifices spoke of rescue and forgiveness from sin.

However, this was not all that John had in mind. John presented Jesus as the Passover lamb whose death marks the central event of the Passover season (see Exod 12:46; Luke 22:7; 1 Cor 5:7). In the first century, Jews made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem each spring to celebrate the Passover and to reread the story of the Exodus (see Exod 12–15). When Israel was being rescued from Egypt, the blood of a lamb was sprinkled on the doorposts of each Jewish home in Egypt and saved those inside from death (Exod 12). Jews who came to Jerusalem to celebrate the Passover needed to supply a perfect young lamb for sacrifice. The animal could not be diseased or have broken bones.

Jesus used his final Passover meal to show that his sacrificial death would give new meaning to the festival (Mark 14:17‑31). In John, the cross became an altar where Christ, the Passover lamb, was slain. Jesus’ legs were not broken (John 19:33), fulfilling a Passover rule (19:36; Exod 12:46). Blood ran freely from his wound (John 19:34), showing that his life was being exchanged for others. Just as a lamb died to save the lives of Jewish families at the Passover in Egypt, so, too, the death of the Son of God on the cross serves to bring salvation to the world.

Learn more about the Illustrated Study Bible

By Faith

“Faith shows the reality of what we hope for; it is the evidence of things we cannot see. Through their faith, the people in days of old earned a good reputation. By faith we understand that the entire universe was formed at God’s command, that what we now see did not come from anything that can be seen.” Hebrews 11:1-3, NLT

Article from the Illustrated Study Bible

Hebrews 11 is one of the most extensive essays on faith in the NT and one of the most loved sections of Scripture, yet misconceptions about faith abound. Some see faith as meaning any form of spirituality (“he is a
person of faith”). Others understand it as a resolute belief that something good is going to happen to them, a ticket to health and wealth. Still others think that faith is a blind leap against known facts. None of these constitutes biblical faith.

Instead, faith involves confident action in response to what God has made known (11:1-3). As seen in the examples listed in ch 11, faith comes into play in a variety of life’s circumstances. The results of faith also are various. Some people get rescued, achieve success in life, and get some of what God has promised in their lifetimes.

Others get mocked, beaten, tortured, put in prison, and killed. Faith is sometimes rewarded sooner and sometimes later, but people of faith anticipate the rewards because of their confidence in God’s character.

What does it mean to live by faith? It means that, in our various circumstances, we live out our belief “that God exists and that he rewards those who sincerely seek him” (11:6). Those who live by faith take confident action based on what God has revealed about his character, seeking to do his will in all things.

Look inside the Illustrated Study Bible

The Holy Spirit’s Presence

Article from the Illustrated Study Bible

The book of Acts clearly highlights the presence and power of the Holy Spirit. Before the coming of the Spirit, Jesus spoke of the Spirit’s influence on the growth of the church (1:8; see John 14:15‑17, 26; 15:26; 16:7‑15). The Spirit’s guidance was clear in the selection of Spirit- filled leaders to care for the needs of the Hellenistic widows (Acts 6:1‑7) and in the appointing of Barnabas and Saul for missionary service (13:1‑5).

When the first church council met to consider the membership of Gentiles in the church, those present followed the Spirit’s direction (15:28). Christian workers such as Stephen and Philip were filled with the Spirit and preached by his power (6:1–8:40), and Paul’s ministry was charged with the Spirit’s energy from the beginning (9:17).

In Acts, the growth, development, and expansion of the church took place entirely under the guidance and power of the Spirit (e.g., 2:4, 41‑47; 4:31; 5:32; 8:15, 17, 29; 9:31). Because of the prominence of the Spirit’s work in Acts, the book has often been called “the Acts of the Holy Spirit.”

The Holy Spirit works in many ways. He gives and restores life (Gen 2:7; Ps 104:24‑30; Ezek 37:1‑14; Joel 2:28‑32; Rom 8:9‑11). He calls and commissions workers for the service of Christ (Acts 13:2; 20:28) and guides God’s servants where and when he wants, to do as he desires (8:29; 9:15; 10:19‑20; 11:12; 16:6; 1 Cor 2:13; 1 Pet 1:12). He inspired the writing of Scripture (2 Tim 3:16‑17; 2 Pet 1:20‑21), instructing the church in Christ’s message (John 14:26; 1 Cor 12:3). He bears witness to the power of the Good News in signs and wonders (Acts 14:3; Heb 2:4), and teaches the truths of the Bible to God’s people (Acts 1:16; Heb 9:8; 10:15‑17; 1 Pet 1:11‑12). He bears witness to Jesus and brings him glory (John 15:26; 16:14). He convicts people of their sinfulness and need for the Good News (John 16:8) and warns people against hardening their hearts (Heb 3:7‑11, 15). He bestows gifts upon God’s people (1 Cor 12:4‑11), and he energizes and equips them to share the Good News, serve the Lord, and work for the Kingdom of God.

Look inside the Illustrated Study Bible

God’s Hand of Healing Day 4

“Jesus left Tyre and went up to Sidon before going back to the Sea of Galilee and the region of the Ten Towns. A deaf man with a speech impediment was brought to him, and the people begged Jesus to lay his hands on the man to heal him.

Jesus led him away from the crowd so they could be alone. He put his fingers into the man’s ears. Then, spitting on his own fingers, he touched the man’s tongue. Looking up to heaven, he sighed and said, ‘Ephphatha,’ which means, ‘Be opened!’ Instantly the man could hear perfectly, and his tongue was freed so he could speak plainly!

Jesus told the crowd not to tell anyone, but the more he told them not to, the more they spread the news. They were completely amazed and said again and again, ‘Everything he does is wonderful. He even makes the deaf to hear and gives speech to those who cannot speak.'” Mark 7:31-37, NLT

Notes from the Illustrated Study Bible

This miracle is very similar in order and vocabulary to the healing of the blind man in 8:22-26. Healing miracles in the Gospels follow a similar pattern—the constant telling and retelling of similar stories probably standardized their form and wording.

This healing miracle includes a change of scene. Although some interpret the next miracle as occurring in the Gentile world (Sidon or Decapolis), it probably took place after Jesus returned to the Sea of Galilee. The next incident takes place there (8:10) without a change of scene.

Jesus also used saliva in a healing at Mark 8:23, where he spit on a man’s eyes in curing his blindness. The medicinal use of saliva in ancient times is well documented.

Since Jesus was looking up to heaven when he sighed, his sigh is probably best understood as a prayerful gesture. Ephphatha is an Aramaic term that Mark translates for his readers (see also 3:17; 5:41; 14:36; 15:34). These are not magical formulas or incantations; Mark is simply recounting some of the original words Jesus spoke. Matthew and Luke do not seem to have attributed any special significance to the Aramaic words of Jesus, since they did not include them in their Gospels.

Despite his desire to avoid attention, Jesus’ greatness shone too brightly—his person, his teaching, and his ability to heal inspired awe, and he could not be hidden.

Look inside the Illustrated Study Bible

Holy Reading Reading Plan Day 7: The Resurrection of Jesus

“The women ran quickly from the tomb. They were very frightened but also filled with great joy, and they rushed to give the disciples the angel’s message. And as they went, Jesus met them and greeted them. And they ran to him, grasped his feet, and worshiped him. Then Jesus said to them, ‘Don’t be afraid! Go tell my brothers to leave for Galilee, and they will see me there.’” Matthew 28:8-10, NLT

Article from the Illustrated Study Bible

Scripture unanimously depicts the personal and bodily resurrection of Jesus from the dead by the power of God, but numerous other attempts to explain it have emerged:

(1) Jesus never really died—instead, he lost consciousness and regained it after being laid in a cool tomb (the swoon theory); (2) the disciples of Jesus stole his body and then lied about a resurrection (28:12‑15); (3) the disciples had hallucinations and dreams that they mistakenly confused with a physical resurrection; and (4) the resurrection is a personal experience in the heart of faith, not an event in history.

Behind such suggestions lies a deep-seated skepticism toward the supernatural, or at least toward whether a miraculous event could have happened. Such suggestions fail to take into account the fact that for NT authors and their audiences, the term “resurrection” could only have meant the literal reanimation of a dead corpse (see 1 Cor 15).

The historicity of Jesus’ resurrection and the historical reliability of the biblical accounts are supported by (1) the evidence of an empty tomb; (2) the presence of women as witnesses (no one would have made up a story with women as witnesses, since the testimony of a woman was considered to be less reliable than that of a man); (3) the varied but basically unified accounts of Jesus’ postresurrection appearances; (4) the transformation of the disciples from a fearful band into fearless followers; and (5) the disciples’ ability to overcome the scandal of following a crucified man (Deut 21:23 indicates that one who dies such a death has fallen under God’s curse).

Judaism had no concept of a dying and rising Messiah that could conveniently be applied to Jesus. Inventing something no one would find conceivable would have made little sense. The most reasonable conclusion is just what the NT announces: that Jesus did, in fact, rise from the dead.

Take a look inside the Illustrated Study Bible