Skip to Main Content

Product Description

Do you have to lower your ethical standards in order to succeed at your job? High-Performance Ethics authors Wes Cantrell and James Lucas say that the answer is no. The authors outline ways to make ethical decisions (based on the Ten Commandments) that lead to highly successful business practices. High-Performance Ethics includes tips on how to lead a team with integrity, practical tools for resisting the pressure to compromise workplace standards, and encouragement for workers who want to see strong businesses—and strong values—thrive.
10 Principles:
  1. First Things Only (priorities)
  2. Ditch the Distractions
  3. Align with Reality (never claim support for a bad cause)
  4. Find Symmetry
  5. Respect the Wise
  6. Protecct the Souls
  7. Commit to the Relationships
  8. Spread the Wealth
  9. Speak the Truth
  10. Limit Your Desires

Product Details

Published:
April 30, 2010
Binding:
E-book

Exclusive Tyndale.com Previews

Dear Mr. Cantrell: I have to express my gratitude to you for the excellent book you have written (with Mr. Lucas). It is really more than a good book to me. . . . Oh, I bought your book in June in New York, and yet I couldn’t find copies in Georgia when I came back here two weeks ago. . . . I wanted to buy it as gifts for my brother and my sister-in-law and my old and new friends in Georgia. I am a third-generation Christian and have been involved in various ministries my entire life (36 years). The older I am, the more dissatisfied I become toward the church culture—the only culture I know in my life. I found that most “Spirit-led” Christians are very afraid of “the world.” Even though I know firmly and have experienced that life in Jesus is the most meaningful event I could ever embrace in this world, I was very unhappy with seeing many Christians at church with little or no professional training (or intentionally avoiding high-level professional training). In my observation, quite a few Christians are drawing an extremely bright-colored line between Faith and Profession. I myself love so much to read and to learn. . . . Having this disturbing feeling inside me for many months, in June (2007) I decided to find solutions to ease my mind and soul and to seek help I need for my job. I decided to visit a secular bookstore for business management books—as far as I can get from the Christian circle. . . . Walking in the Barnes

Dear Wes: Congratulations on your latest achievement! It’s refreshing to read a business book that is a true reflection of the author’s beliefs—which is what yours undoubtedly is. It kept me up until 2 a.m. Monday morning since I could not put it down after I started it. It also brought a lot of very good memories for me and made me realize how much I miss working with you. Wes, you are a true leader and a charismatic and inspirational man who has achieved what few CEOs have: instilling real and true values both into a business endeavor and into its management group. With respect, admiration, and affection.

Brother Wes, I have greatly enjoyed your book. Prior to coming to FBCW I worked for a construction company where unethical practices were expected. I would not succumb. One of the best compliments I received when leaving was the CEO saying, “You’re going to work for a church? That is a great place for you.” My difference was noticed. I just read the conclusion this morning, Wes, and I must agree with you—your family is a great accomplishment. I was shocked to see how many grandchildren you have—I believe this is a testimony to the joy your own children had in growing in your home. If a family is a great experience while growing up, naturally your children will desire to have big families. We love the Cantrells!