Skip to Main Content

Product Description

One Million Copies Sold in Series!
Christian Book Award: ECPA Medallion of Excellence


Stan and Brenna Jones help parents establish a biblical view of sexuality in their homes. Building on a biblical foundation, they discuss how to talk with your children about sexual issues and when it’s appropriate to tell them what. With stark honesty and practical suggestions, they address
  • Building a Christian understanding of sex and sexuality
  • Developing a healthy dialogue with children about sexuality
  • How and when to explain sexual intercourse
  • Preparing for the physical changes of puberty
  • Preparing for dating: dealing with romance and sexual attraction
  • Encouraging a commitment to chastity
  • What to do if you’re getting a late start telling your kids about sex
Now revised and updated with helpful material on the dangers of pornography, sexual orientation, and gender identity.

Product Details

Published:
Binding:
Softcover
Trim Size:
6 x 9 in.
Pages:
304
ISBN:
978-1-63146-944-2

Exclusive Tyndale.com Previews

Over a decade ago, and before I knew the authors personally, my wife and I relied on Stan and Brenna Jones’s How and When to Tell Your Kids about Sex for guidance on talking to our kids. Having seen their wisdom and insight up close, we still call them for parenting advice! The good news is that you can also rely on their wisdom in their newly updated version of How and When, with solid advice needed in today’s world.

Many Christian parents struggle with how to engage and influence their kids around questions of sexuality and gender—all the more as norms regarding sex and gender seem to shift beneath their feet. The God’s Design for Sex series by Stan and Brenna Jones provides valuable guidance and practical information that will serve as both anchor and lighthouse to many parents who feel tossed by the waves of a rapidly changing culture.

The sexual revolution has come as a wake-up call for Christian parents and educators alike. The “home team” now feels like the “away team,” and in a society so far adrift from its Christian moorings, parents can no longer try to outsource the moral formation of their children. Our greatest challenge is to show what we are for as well as what we are against, and Stan and Brenna Jones have done the church a great service here. A comprehensive and authoritative set of resources, the God’s Design for Sex series integrates biblical instruction with evidence from the social sciences, common sense, and practical wisdom. Most important of all, it fires the imagination with a positive vision of the divine gift of sex and human sexuality. This is the go-to resource for all Christian parents, educators, and pastors who care about the biblically rooted formation and flourishing of their children.

Stan and Brenna Jones have done their homework. In a world of great sexual confusion, where cheap opinions and “hot takes” seem to be winning the day, these two are rising up as incredibly sane and sophisticated voices that can help show us the way.

This is a book for our times. Although directed to parents, it will be useful to all involved in nurturing the next generation: grandparents, caregivers, teachers, and the whole church community. How and When to Tell Your Kids about Sex deals with sexuality as part of God’s good plan for humanity and parenting as nurturing godly, wholesome young men and women rather than producing good kids.

It is comprehensive and deals sensitively with difficult topics, using research on parenting styles and sexual health to encourage and empower parents to be the first, principle, and continuing source of sex education for their children. In addressing relationships from the perspectives of chaste singleness and faithful, godly marriage, the book confronts the clash of cultures between a biblical worldview and the postmodern, individualistic mind-set. It challenges parents to enable children of all ages to live in a way that is countercultural to current tropes for sex, identity, and gender. Above all, it directs us all, as fallen and forgiven people, to grace-based (rather than law-driven) parenting.